Aladdin from The Arabian Nights Tales

Aladdin and the Magic Lamp from The Arabian Nights ~ Bedtime Stories Folk Tales for Kids

Adapted from the original story of “Aladdin” from The Arabian Nights, also known as One Thousand and One Nights Folktales. Told with a Modern #MeToo twist.

 

Once upon a time, a young man’s father died.  Aladdin, as that was the young man’s name, took his father’s place in running the family store with his mother.  One day, a stranger walked into the store.

“I am your uncle,” said the stranger to Aladdin.  “I have come to see you.”

“But my father never spoke of a brother,” said Aladdin.

Aladdin’s mother turned around. “My husband had no brother,” said she to the stranger, narrowing her eyes.

 

“But my father never spoke of a brother,” said Aladdin.

 

“I assure you it is true,” said the stranger. “Years ago your husband and I agreed that if something should happen to him, since I have been very fortunate in my life, I would help to bring the same good fortune to your family.”

The mother was interested.  “What do you have in mind?” she said.

“I know of a secret place that holds many riches,” said the stranger.  “I will take your son. With the wealth he will find there, you and he will be set for life.”

And so the mother agreed.  The old man and the boy traveled for days throughout the desert.  At last they came to a cave. “You must know that I learned a bit of magic in my life,” said the old man to Aladdin.  “Don’t be surprised by anything you might see.”

 

“I know of a secret place that holds many riches,” said the stranger.

 

They stepped inside the cave.  Pitch-black it was. The old man shook open his fist and a ball of light suddenly appeared, brightening the cave.  Under the light with one long finger, he drew the shape of a circle over the ground. He pulled from his pocket some red dust and threw it over the circle, and at the same time said some magic words.  The earth trembled a little before them. The floor of the cave cracked open, and the cracks grew wider and deeper. Then up from below the ground rose a giant white quartz crystal and it filled the circle. 

“Do not be alarmed,” said the magician.  “Under this giant white crystal lies a treasure that is to be yours.”    

He chanted a few magic words and the giant crystal rose up several feet in the air, moved to the side and landed.  Aladdin peered into the hole. He saw steps that led down to a dark hole.

 

“Under this giant white crystal lies a treasure that is to be yours.”

 

 “Fear nothing,” said the magician to Aladdin. “But obey me. Go down, and at the foot of the steps, follow a long hall.  You will walk through a garden of fruit trees. You must touch nothing of them. Walk on till you come to a large flat stone and on the stone will be a lighted lamp.  Pour out the oil in the lamp and bring it to me. Now go!”

Aladdin slowly stepped down the stairs.  Through the garden of fruit trees and marvelous to behold, the trees held fruits that sparkled and shone. He could not help but reach out and touch one.  Then – too late – he remembered what his uncle had said. But nothing terrible happened. So he figured he might as well put the fine jewel-fruit in his vest pocket.  Then he plucked another and another jewel-fruit, till all his pockets were filled.

Aladdin came to the large flat stone, and on it was a lighted lamp, just as his uncle had said.  He poured out the oil and took it back to the opening of the cave.

 

Aladdin came to the large flat stone, and on it was a lighted lamp, just as his uncle had said.

 

Aladdin called out, “Here I am, Uncle!”

The magician called out in a great hurry, “Give me the lamp!”

“Just as soon as I’m up,” said Aladdin, wondering why the magician seemed in such a hurry.  

“No, give me the lamp NOW!” cried the old man, reaching down his hand.  For you see, the only way the lamp could come out of the cave was as a gift, from one person to another.  The magician knew this, and he wanted to get the lamp from the boy as soon as he could, and then kill him.  Aladdin felt a chill in the air. Something was wrong. Somehow he knew he must not give up that lamp.  

“Let me up first,” said Aladdin.  “Then will I give you the lamp.”

 

Aladdin felt a chill in the air.  Something was wrong.

 

The magician was furious. He fell into a rage and barked out more magical words.  The giant white quartz crystal rose up, hovered over the hole and landed. All went dark below. Aladdin was trapped!

For two days, Aladdin despaired.  “Why didn’t I just hand over this old lamp?  Who cares about it, anyway?  Whatever might have come of it, it couldn’t have been worse than this!  What was I thinking?”

Rubbing the lamp, he moaned, “Oh, how I wish I could get out of here!”

At once, a huge Genie rose up into the air.  “You are my master!” boomed the Genie. “Was that your first wish – to get out of this cave?  Three wishes are yours to command.”

 

“Oh, how I wish I could get out of here!”

 

Aladdin’s mouth fell open, amazed. He mumbled yes, of course!  More than anything he wanted to get out of the cave and go home!  The very next moment, Aladdin was outside his own home, still holding the lamp and with all his jewel-fruits in his vest pockets.  

His mother could not believe the tale her son told her.  “Magic lamp?” she laughed. “That old thing?” She took the lamp, grabbed a rag, and started to clean it.  “If there were really a Genie in this old lamp, I would say to it, ‘Genie, make a feast for my son and me, and serve it on plates of gold!’”

You can imagine the mother’s surprise!  The Genie rose up out of the lamp, and a feast fit for a king weighed down her kitchen table, on plates of glimmering gold.    

 

You can imagine the mother’s surprise!

 

Mother and son enjoyed a feast like no other.  Then the mother washed and sold the gold plates, and bought necessary things to live.  From then on, Aladdin and his mother lived well.

One day, Aladdin thought to himself, “Why think small?  With my jewel-fruits, I could marry the princess and become the prince of this land!”

His mother laughed.  “You can’t just go to a palace with some fine gifts and expect to marry the princess!”  But Aladdin urged her to try. They wrapped some of the jewel-fruits in silk cloth, and the mother went to the palace.

The guards stopped her at once.  But as she insisted she had something very valuable for the Sultan, they let her in.

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